Inside Lowther Castle, The Lake District

Inside Lowther Castle, The Lake District

It was a little while since I’d last been

The last time I visited Lowther Castle was about twenty five years ago and it looked a lot different back then!  Yep, back then it was a derelict ruin; it had statue and prowess but really it was just a crumbling mass of stones in the middle of a lot of grass (120 acres to be precise).

We used to visit for walks (back then you could park on the grass and picnic freely) and of course there was the Lowther Country Show in the summer but mostly it was just a childhood memory of a relic of a building that had just ‘always been there’.

Lowther Castle
Lowther Castle from the road running through the park. When I last visited none of the western wings existed.

Its history

It has a rather grand but confusing and sad history, one that incorporates abandonment, death, family feuds and bankruptcy. (1)

The story is rather convoluted and it appears that the castle has stood since the 14th century when Sir Hugh de Lowther was granted a charter to enclose a 200 acre tract of land for a deer park beside the River Lowther. Sir Hugh built a motte and Bailey fortification beside the river but later in the 14th century this was replaced by a Pele tower to defend against Scottish raids. Another tower was added in the 16th century and by the 17th century a central block joined the two towers.  The medieval building was torn down in the late 1600’s and replaced with a Jacobean residence.  A huge fire in 1718 ruined the house until 1806 when it was re-built in the style of a medieval castle

The Lowthers who are titled with grandiose names such as the  Earl of Lonsdale and 1st viscount of Lonsdale and have held the castle in their names since the 1400’s.  effectively it seems that the castle was in use until the 1930’s but then closed due to the extravagance of the 5th Earl of Lonsdale and the second world war.

In order to avoid paying a death duty bill, the contents of the castle were removed in the 1940’s and the roof in 1957.

Famous visitors

Aside from the Queen and Prince Philip, another famous and frequent visitor to the castle was William Wordsworth who wrote this poem.

“Lowther! in thy majestic Pile are seen

Cathedral pomp and grace in apt accord

With the baronial castle’s sterner mien” 1

Current

 

It seems to me that the castle is currently owned by a mix of Trusts & Estates. I cannot seem to work out which does what, however it does appear that this has been done to extract as much money as possible from the EU and various other money giving agencies.  The castle was abandoned for 70 years and the Lowther’s seem to have done everything possible in that time to avoid paying their fair share of tax and certainly weren’t interested in resurrecting the castle however they’re now more than happy to charge £28 for a family of four to visit and have blocked up all the verge access within the park (meaning you cannot park for free).  There are also signs everywhere forbidding picnicking and various other things.  Call me cynical but they do seem to have exploited EU finance for their own gain.

Anyway… after 70 years of neglect, the castle has found some of its former glory and magic and we were delighted to visit.

Lowther Castle
Its current condition from inside the grounds

Opening hours

Opening hours can be found here. The castle, unlike many attractions in The Lake District, is open all year round.

We visited mid-November (yesterday in fact) and whilst the gardens are a little sparse in Winter, the grounds are still spectacular and if you don’t mind the cold and wind, there’s still much to see and do. Just wrap up warm and expect every weather inside ten minutes!

Different areas

There are at least twenty different areas to explore. If you intend to do them all, you will need to allow an absolute minimum of two hours.  If you have children, I can guarantee they’ll want to spend AGES in the castle play area.

The map at the entrance is far easier to understand than the paper map you’re given.  We got lost a number of times around the east side of the castle. This might have been because the gardens have few flowers in them (as it’s winter) and we had no real visual clue as to where we were. However, I suggest taking a copy of this map as it’s far more comprehensive.

We followed the map in the opposite direction; starting at 18 and working our way around to 4. I found it a much better route for us than the other way.  I shall, however, blog in the direction of te map below.

 

The Courtyard

The courtyard contains a cafe, shops, gallery and stables.  We had a look in the cafe and a hot chocolate was £2.95.  I have no idea how this compares to other tourist attractions or cafes. They had some nice looking cakes on display however as sugar free vegans, it was always going to be a tough one for us! We decided that as we were only staying five minutes away, we would go home. Phew!

We arrived just before 2pm and left just after 4pm and all afternoon we had a constant mix of sunshine, black clouds, rain and wind.

Lowther castle
We arrived at 2pm to sunshine and black clouds
Lowther Castle
We left the courtyard at Lowther Castle just as the sun was starting to set
Lowther Castle
The courtyard at Lowther Castle just as sun was beginning to set

Entrance

This is where you’ll be relieved of your money. Enter the gate and the gate house is to your left. They accept payment through cash and card. We paid £29 (I think) for one adult and three children. They also offer annual and lifetime subscriptions.

Lowther Castle
Entrance to the far right

South Lawns

The south lawns are directly facing the entrance and castle. They are relatively nondescript however as an expanse of near perfect grass goes, it is an enormous feat of success.

Lowther castle
The view of the lawns from the ruins
Lowther Castle
The view of the south lawns and castle
Lowther Castle
The south lawns and castle

Tree Swings

The tree swings are a great idea for kids and there are two in the same area as well as tree stumps and rope walks.

Lowther Castle
Tree swings
Lowther Castle
Lowther Castle Tree Swings
Lowther Castle
Enjoying the tree swings

Jack Croft’s Pond

The pond was once used for ice and water by Jack an employed crofter. It now houses a summer-house which gives lovely views over the pond.

Lowther Castle
Jack crofter’s pond
Lowther Castle
Jack crofter pond
Lowther Castle
jack crofter’s pond

The hidden castle adventure playground

I am not sure which is better, Lowther Castle or The hidden castle? I know which my kids would say. I had to prize them away with threats and coercion! I didn’t take a watch so I have no idea how long we spent here but I guestimate it was about 30 minutes. At least.

You reach the start of the children’s area with a zig-zag selection of wooden bridges, walk ways, a walking seesaw and stepping stone trunks which leads you to the entrance of the playground.  So, where do I start describing just how BRILLIANT the castle is? The zip wire? The crawling tunnel? The fireman’s pole? The toddler section? It is just amazing and yes, it deserves all TWELVE photos I am about to upload.

The kids could have happily spent all afternoon there, despite the pouring rain!

Lowther Castle
The start of the playground
Lowther Castle
Jump between tree stumps
Lowther Castle
The castle
Lowther Castle
The castle
Lowther Castle
the toddler section to the right
Lowther Castle
The zip wire
Lowther Castle
The zip wire
Lowther Castle
The zip wire. Can you tell it was a favourite?
Lowther Castle
Crawling and hanging
Lowther Castle
Crawling over the nets
Lowther Castle
The viewing tunnel
Lowther Castle
The castle

 The Escarpment walk

I wasn’t in charge of map reading when we were here, instead I left it to the kids.  Originally they told me this was called ‘The Enchanted Walk’ and that kind of stuck with me.  This was MY favourite part of the gardens and I could have quite happily just spent all my time walking up the leaf covered pathways and admiring the view over the valley.

Escarpment actually means a long, steep slope, especially one at the edge of a plateau or separating areas of land at different heights.

The walk contained squirrel hides, the jubilee summer-house and views over the valley and river.

Lowther Castle
The start of the walk
Lowther Castle
Beautiful autumnal colours line the pathways
Lowther Castle
The squirrel hide
Lowther Castle
Walking in the leaves
Lowther Castle
The start of the view over the valley
Lowther Castle
The valley view
Lowther Castle
The jubilee summerhouse
Lowther Castle
The jubilee summerhouse
Lowther Castle
The summerhouse
Lowther Castle
Admiring the view
Lowther Castle
Tree stumps to admire the view from
Lowther Castle
A panoramic view of the valley

Steps up to Patte d’Oie

This is an area not listed on the map but it is worthy of some words as it is picturesque in its own right.

Lowther Castle
Steps around Iris Gardens
Lowther Castle
Steps leading up to Patte D’Oie
Lowther Castle
The view of Lowther Castle from the steps
Lowther Castle
Staircase leading to Patte D’Oie

Countess Garden & The Orchard

I suspect these areas are a bit nicer during the summer months when flowers and plants are blooming. For now, the orchard was a little sparse.

Lowther Castle
The countess gardens
Lowther castle
From the orchard
Lowther castle
From the orchard
Lowther castle
From the orchard

Inside the ruins

The ruins themselves are spectacular and have been renovated to a high standard. It’s a beautiful building and to be inside its walls is a great feeling. A lot of care has been taken on the inside gardens and they are flourishing well.

Lowther castle
The ruins
Lowther castle
Inside the ruins
Lowther castle
Inside the ruins
Lowther castle
Inside the ruins
Lowther castle
Inside the ruins
Lowther castle
The ruins of the castle from the greens

Ongoing works

There are a few areas that are still under development; one of the outside turrets/gate houses, a section to the west of the castle and a section of tiled garden. I am not sure when these will be finished.

Lowther castle Lowther castle

Last photo and final words on Lowther Castle

So, what do I make of the Lowther castle now? I am in awe of the work that has been completed. Yes, it has cost 9 MILLION POUNDS to date with another million pounds worth of work needed! It is absolutely no small sum of money however bringing the castle back to life is fantastic. This castle shaped our history and without it The Lake District may have succumbed to Scottish rule. It is a critical part of The Lake District and I am really pleased that it has been resurrected.

My only criticism of the project is the entrance fee. I can understand charging that amount for tourists as a one off fee however local residents don’t get any reduction in entrance.  Local wages aren’t very high and to deprive many locals of the opportunity to see the castle is, in my opinion, wrong.

A yearly entrance fee for our family works out at £140. I would pay that but then I’m not subject to local wages.

Lowther Castle
Lowther Castle in all its glory!

 

 

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